When Readers Determine the Binding

According to Market Share Reports, in August 2017 the top-used web browser on desktop computers was Chrome. Its combined versions were used by 59.38% of people online worldwide. Second place was Internet Explorer, which, combined with the stats for Edge, Microsoft’s new banner browser, accounted for 21.24% of web users. Trailing behind these were Firefox,

Capturing the Ephemeral

Part 2 of the Technical Guidelines Series focuses on documentation. It’s a topic that is touched on in the previous Archivability section, but it’s one that really requires a bit more unpacking, so it has its own page in our recommendations package. As usual, I won’t reprint the document in this blog post—you can view

FAQ: What does the acquisitions editor do?

As Acquisitions Editor, my role is to find valuable projects, review them, and guide authors in developing them to their final form. My core concerns in this process are scholarly merit and intellectual integrity. While we require projects to make a contribution to scholarship along the same lines as monographs, that is, advancing complex arguments,

Considering Archivability

Developing a scholarly digital project is a complex process. In addition to the research and writing typical of any scholarly project, authors must choose a platform or a framework that suits the needs of both the argument and content. Depending on their digital literacies, they may need to learn these systems and recruit collaborators with

SUP @ DH2017

It’s been two weeks since we released the video, featured right, promoting our digital publishing program here at Stanford University Press, and the feedback so far has been encouraging. The video has been circulating among the scholarly communications community, and we hope our readers will continue to share it with their colleagues in not just the

Experiments in Digital

We are now two and a half years into our four-year experiment in digital publishing. Our goal, to establish a program for the formal, peer-reviewed publication of scholarly works that are truly interactive, with no print counterpart, was an ambitious one, and the learning curve has been incredibly steep. But we’re now at the point

Tracking Changes in Digital Publishing

A digital publishing program like ours, which prides itself on being platform agnostic, offers exciting potential for variety in the look and feel of final publication formats but also ensures that some of the production processes typical within a press can never be completely standardized. As I mentioned last week and will write more about in

Being a Good Host

The delivery of a book, from author to press and then press to reader, despite its complexity, is pretty well established. Stanford University Press, for example, has been doing it for 125 years. University presses outside the United States have been doing it for as long as 430 years or better. Much can be streamlined in

Preserving Born-Digital Scholarship

One of my first projects as digital production associate for the works being published under SUP’s Mellon-funded digital publishing initiative was to create a set of technical guidelines. It has proven to be a complex undertaking and one that is unearthing many philosophical questions and considerations. Over three months of work on these documents, which will be