Category: #supdigital

What’s in a File Name?

In the year 2017, over three decades since the personal computer became virtually commonplace in homes, it’s probably safe to assume many of us have come across the stray CD ROM or USB thumb drive or maybe even floppy disk and eagerly, or perhaps with trepidation, inserted it into a working computer or external drive

What’s in a Font?

Perhaps the most appealing aspect of the web as a scholarly publication platform is the ability to make your work interact with content or data that others already have made accessible online. For instance, Scalar can access networks of archives, collections, and resources from places like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Internet Archive, the

The Logic of the Link

When imagining the various platforms and formats digital authors are using to communicate their complex and interactive arguments, it can be easy to overlook some of the simpler components of web-based content. The topics we’ve covered so far in the Technical Guidelines series have ranged from somewhat to significantly philosophical, but our focus this week,

Taking It on the Road

This week our team travels to New York to participate in a convening of Mellon-funded scholarly communications projects. Part of the aim is to share with each other our purpose, progress, challenges, and next steps. We’re looking forward to learning what our friends are doing and sharing our own experiences with them. The group will

When Readers Determine the Binding

According to Market Share Reports, in August 2017 the top-used web browser on desktop computers was Chrome. Its combined versions were used by 59.38% of people online worldwide. Second place was Internet Explorer, which, combined with the stats for Edge, Microsoft’s new banner browser, accounted for 21.24% of web users. Trailing behind these were Firefox,

Capturing the Ephemeral

Part 2 of the Technical Guidelines Series focuses on documentation. It’s a topic that is touched on in the previous Archivability section, but it’s one that really requires a bit more unpacking, so it has its own page in our recommendations package. As usual, I won’t reprint the document in this blog post—you can view

FAQ: What does the acquisitions editor do?

As Acquisitions Editor, my role is to find valuable projects, review them, and guide authors in developing them to their final form. My core concerns in this process are scholarly merit and intellectual integrity. While we require projects to make a contribution to scholarship along the same lines as monographs, that is, advancing complex arguments,

Considering Archivability

Developing a scholarly digital project is a complex process. In addition to the research and writing typical of any scholarly project, authors must choose a platform or a framework that suits the needs of both the argument and content. Depending on their digital literacies, they may need to learn these systems and recruit collaborators with

SUP @ DH2017

It’s been two weeks since we released the video, featured right, promoting our digital publishing program here at Stanford University Press, and the feedback so far has been encouraging. The video has been circulating among the scholarly communications community, and we hope our readers will continue to share it with their colleagues in not just the