Category: #supdigital

New Releases for Spring 2018

Our Spring 2018 catalogs recently arrived, and we are excited to announce three interactive scholarly works to be published in the upcoming season. They are, in order of publication:  Samuel Liebhaber, When Melodies Gather The Mahra people of the southern Arabian Peninsula have no written language but instead possess a rich oral tradition. Samuel Liebhaber

Call for expressions of interest: your novel idea of publication

Originally posted at the King’s Digital Lab blog by Arianna Ciula: Stanford University Press (SUP) and King’s Digital Lab (KDL, King’s College London) invite expressions of interest to propose ideas for a digital academic publication blending cutting-edge technology with very high quality scholarship. KDL and SUP wish to collaborate with interested researchers in developing a scholarly product that

Saving the Internet: An Interview with Webrecorder’s Dragan Espenchied

As is apparent by now, we spend a lot of time thinking about ways to preserve and archive the digital web-based projects we’re publishing. While our technical guidelines provide authors with recommendations for building projects that are more easily sustainable, the fact is technology changes, and even the most rigid technical standards and requirements will

A Not So Little Side Project

Being a pioneer in digital publishing means we have plenty of experiences to share, both successful and, well, educational, but not always very many people to share them with. Although we benefit from fellow presses’ digital initiatives and they graciously keep tabs on and encourage ours, much of our work is very different and it’s

What’s in a File Name?

In the year 2017, over three decades since the personal computer became virtually commonplace in homes, it’s probably safe to assume many of us have come across the stray CD ROM or USB thumb drive or maybe even floppy disk and eagerly, or perhaps with trepidation, inserted it into a working computer or external drive

What’s in a Font?

Perhaps the most appealing aspect of the web as a scholarly publication platform is the ability to make your work interact with content or data that others already have made accessible online. For instance, Scalar can access networks of archives, collections, and resources from places like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Internet Archive, the

The Logic of the Link

When imagining the various platforms and formats digital authors are using to communicate their complex and interactive arguments, it can be easy to overlook some of the simpler components of web-based content. The topics we’ve covered so far in the Technical Guidelines series have ranged from somewhat to significantly philosophical, but our focus this week,

Taking It on the Road

This week our team travels to New York to participate in a convening of Mellon-funded scholarly communications projects. Part of the aim is to share with each other our purpose, progress, challenges, and next steps. We’re looking forward to learning what our friends are doing and sharing our own experiences with them. The group will

When Readers Determine the Binding

According to Market Share Reports, in August 2017 the top-used web browser on desktop computers was Chrome. Its combined versions were used by 59.38% of people online worldwide. Second place was Internet Explorer, which, combined with the stats for Edge, Microsoft’s new banner browser, accounted for 21.24% of web users. Trailing behind these were Firefox,