Category: #supdigital

Thomas S. Mullaney’s The Chinese Deathscape Published

We are pleased to announce the publication of our fourth interactive scholarly work, Thomas S. Mullaney’s The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China. Edited by a Stanford faculty member and built by Stanford Libraries, this publication is truly homegrown. In it, three historians of China, Jeffrey Snyder-Reinke, Christian Henriot, and Thomas S. Mullaney, chart

From Publication to Digital Repository

Creating an archive of an interactive scholarly work’s publication components in the Stanford Digital Repository is a time-intensive and collaborative effort. The source and content files of our first publication, Enchanting the Desert, have now been fully accessioned, deposited, and processed in the Stanford Digital Repository. Aside from the collection record itself and the referenced

Reaching Real Audiences Virtually

A typical book publishing workflow necessarily includes a stage at the end of the process in which a book makes its way into stores and libraries. Because it’s a physical object, it requires physical space devoted to its delivery from publisher to reader. But what happens when the book isn’t a physical object, and doesn’t

Continuing the Conversation at SSP

With the IIPC panel still fresh in our minds, we’re looking forward to another opportunity to share our work, this time with a group a little less focused, perhaps, on digital preservation, but widely experienced in typical and emerging workflows for publishing. We learned last week that a proposed panel, organized by CLOCKSS’s Craig van

Granular Web Archiving at IIPC

As is pretty clear by now, we’re spending a lot of time and energy in the pursuit of ensuring the digital work we’re publishing at SUP is just as long-lived as a typical scholarly monograph. We’ve zeroed in on three approaches, and the one that has been most successful so far is web archiving. So

Paradigm Shift at IIPC

“We are facing an archival moment” said Lorraine Daston recently in her talk “Big Science, Big Humanities and the Archives of the Year 3000”. The unease and uncertainty of this moment was palpable at the IIPC Web Archiving Conference in Wellington earlier this month. Web archiving is consumed with capturing content that is ever-changing, served

Alisa Lebow on Filming Revolution

by ALISA LEBOW Over thirty filmmakers, archivists, activists, and artists were interviewed for Filming Revolution in two research trips to Cairo, the first in December 2013, the second in May and June 2014. The first set of interviews occurred just after a long and arduous military curfew was lifted, part of the state of emergency

Announcing Filming Revolution

We’re excited to announce the latest publication from our Mellon-supported digital publishing initiative. Alisa Lebow’s Filming Revolution investigates documentary and independent filmmaking in Egypt since the Egyptian Revolution began in 2011. It brings together the collective wisdom and creative strategies of thirty filmmakers, artists, activists, and archivists who share their thoughts and experiences of filmmaking in those

Anatomy of a Landing Page

While complex web-based projects present challenges in the way of longevity—the average lifespan of a typical website is supposedly two to five years—there are measures that we’re taking to mitigate inevitable decay. In addition to our guidelines package and three-pronged preservation strategy, which we begin planning for before a project is even published, we’re also