Category: #supdigital

The Stanford University Press Digital Publishing Initiative Receives $1.15 Million to Implement Phase 2 of the Program

The three-year grant will help accelerate growth and ensure ongoing success of the digital publishing program. A proposal to continue the development of a digital publishing initiative at Stanford University has been awarded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Modeling how humanistic and social science research is presented and disseminated online, the Stanford University Press

Society for Scholarly Publishing 2019 Conference

SUP Digital Production Associate Jasmine Mulliken presented on a panel along with colleagues at Michigan Publishing and CLOCKSS to discuss the challenges of interactive publications. The kind of work we’re doing—innovating scholarly publishing for the web—puts us on the cusp of various fields of study. And that means the conferences we end up attending cover

More Collaboration for Enduring Digital Scholarship

SUP is named as one of several collaborators in a new Mellon-funded initiative for digital content publishers and preservation services. Stanford University Press, specifically its digital initiative, is joining with a handful of other digitally progressive scholarly publishers to test the capacity and potential of some well-known preservation services including CLOCKSS and Portico in a

Approaching Emulation

After much preparation and anticipation, emulation testing is just around the corner for Stanford Libraries and, by extension, Stanford University Press. We’re hopeful that serving as a host node for the EaaSI project will shed light on whether this complex process can serve the preservation needs of the interactive scholarly works we’re publishing. Emulation as

Thomas S. Mullaney’s The Chinese Deathscape Published

We are pleased to announce the publication of our fourth interactive scholarly work, Thomas S. Mullaney’s The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China. Edited by a Stanford faculty member and built by Stanford Libraries, this publication is truly homegrown. In it, three historians of China, Jeffrey Snyder-Reinke, Christian Henriot, and Thomas S. Mullaney, chart

From Publication to Digital Repository

Creating an archive of an interactive scholarly work’s publication components in the Stanford Digital Repository is a time-intensive and collaborative effort. The source and content files of our first publication, Enchanting the Desert, have now been fully accessioned, deposited, and processed in the Stanford Digital Repository. Aside from the collection record itself and the referenced

Reaching Real Audiences Virtually

A typical book publishing workflow necessarily includes a stage at the end of the process in which a book makes its way into stores and libraries. Because it’s a physical object, it requires physical space devoted to its delivery from publisher to reader. But what happens when the book isn’t a physical object, and doesn’t

Continuing the Conversation at SSP

With the IIPC panel still fresh in our minds, we’re looking forward to another opportunity to share our work, this time with a group a little less focused, perhaps, on digital preservation, but widely experienced in typical and emerging workflows for publishing. We learned last week that a proposed panel, organized by CLOCKSS’s Craig van

Granular Web Archiving at IIPC

As is pretty clear by now, we’re spending a lot of time and energy in the pursuit of ensuring the digital work we’re publishing at SUP is just as long-lived as a typical scholarly monograph. We’ve zeroed in on three approaches, and the one that has been most successful so far is web archiving. So