Author: Jasmine Mulliken

Net Neutrality and Digital Publishing

It doesn’t seem right, given my role in and advocacy of web-based digital scholarship, not to say something about the ongoing fight for net neutrality. If you’ve been following the news regarding net neutrality (regarding a lot of things actually), you know we’re facing dangerous times. The recent rollback of regulations on internet service providers,

AHA, MLA, and 2018

2018 is already off to a busy start for supDigital. We covered a couple different conferences last week and are managing the typical catch-up as we return to the office. The American Historical Association held its conference in Washington, D.C. this year, and I attended a pre-conference THATCamp where I engaged with digital historians working

More on Web Archiving

A few weeks ago I posted an interview with Webrecorder’s Dragan Espenchied in which he detailed the features and uses of the web-archiving tool developed by Rhizome. A fellow Mellon-funded project, Webrecorder has been especially intriguing to us because it is perhaps the most specifically focused solution to providing readers of our web-based interactive scholarly

Saving the Internet: An Interview with Webrecorder’s Dragan Espenchied

As is apparent by now, we spend a lot of time thinking about ways to preserve and archive the digital web-based projects we’re publishing. While our technical guidelines provide authors with recommendations for building projects that are more easily sustainable, the fact is technology changes, and even the most rigid technical standards and requirements will

A Not So Little Side Project

Being a pioneer in digital publishing means we have plenty of experiences to share, both successful and, well, educational, but not always very many people to share them with. Although we benefit from fellow presses’ digital initiatives and they graciously keep tabs on and encourage ours, much of our work is very different and it’s

What’s in a File Name?

In the year 2017, over three decades since the personal computer became virtually commonplace in homes, it’s probably safe to assume many of us have come across the stray CD ROM or USB thumb drive or maybe even floppy disk and eagerly, or perhaps with trepidation, inserted it into a working computer or external drive

What’s in a Font?

Perhaps the most appealing aspect of the web as a scholarly publication platform is the ability to make your work interact with content or data that others already have made accessible online. For instance, Scalar can access networks of archives, collections, and resources from places like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Internet Archive, the

The Logic of the Link

When imagining the various platforms and formats digital authors are using to communicate their complex and interactive arguments, it can be easy to overlook some of the simpler components of web-based content. The topics we’ve covered so far in the Technical Guidelines series have ranged from somewhat to significantly philosophical, but our focus this week,

Taking It on the Road

This week our team travels to New York to participate in a convening of Mellon-funded scholarly communications projects. Part of the aim is to share with each other our purpose, progress, challenges, and next steps. We’re looking forward to learning what our friends are doing and sharing our own experiences with them. The group will