Author: Jasmine Mulliken

Approaching Emulation

After much preparation and anticipation, emulation testing is just around the corner for Stanford Libraries and, by extension, Stanford University Press. We’re hopeful that serving as a host node for the EaaSI project will shed light on whether this complex process can serve the preservation needs of the interactive scholarly works we’re publishing. Emulation as

From Publication to Digital Repository

Creating an archive of an interactive scholarly work’s publication components in the Stanford Digital Repository is a time-intensive and collaborative effort. The source and content files of our first publication, Enchanting the Desert, have now been fully accessioned, deposited, and processed in the Stanford Digital Repository. Aside from the collection record itself and the referenced

Reaching Real Audiences Virtually

A typical book publishing workflow necessarily includes a stage at the end of the process in which a book makes its way into stores and libraries. Because it’s a physical object, it requires physical space devoted to its delivery from publisher to reader. But what happens when the book isn’t a physical object, and doesn’t

Continuing the Conversation at SSP

With the IIPC panel still fresh in our minds, we’re looking forward to another opportunity to share our work, this time with a group a little less focused, perhaps, on digital preservation, but widely experienced in typical and emerging workflows for publishing. We learned last week that a proposed panel, organized by CLOCKSS’s Craig van

Granular Web Archiving at IIPC

As is pretty clear by now, we’re spending a lot of time and energy in the pursuit of ensuring the digital work we’re publishing at SUP is just as long-lived as a typical scholarly monograph. We’ve zeroed in on three approaches, and the one that has been most successful so far is web archiving. So

Anatomy of a Landing Page

While complex web-based projects present challenges in the way of longevity—the average lifespan of a typical website is supposedly two to five years—there are measures that we’re taking to mitigate inevitable decay. In addition to our guidelines package and three-pronged preservation strategy, which we begin planning for before a project is even published, we’re also

DoingDS References SUP Project and Author

­­­ The Digital Culture Program and the Social Science Research Council Labs has released its Doing Digital Scholarship (DoingDS) modules, a compilation of self-directed instructional resources aimed at scholars and students in the digital humanities and social sciences and their peers. The curriculum ranges from digital identity building to specific digital tools to developing projects

Webrecorder Does It Again

A few months ago, I wrote about my continued adventures in web-archiving our initiative’s first publication, Enchanting the Desert. I won’t repeat the details here, but essentially I came to the conclusion that Rhizome’s Webrecorder was the best tool for that job. It was able to capture some of the dynamic JavaScript that wasn’t being