DoingDS References SUP Project and Author

­­­ The Digital Culture Program and the Social Science Research Council Labs has released its Doing Digital Scholarship (DoingDS) modules, a compilation of self-directed instructional resources aimed at scholars and students in the digital humanities and social sciences and their peers. The curriculum ranges from digital identity building to specific digital tools to developing projects

Webrecorder Does It Again

A few months ago, I wrote about my continued adventures in web-archiving our initiative’s first publication, Enchanting the Desert. I won’t repeat the details here, but essentially I came to the conclusion that Rhizome’s Webrecorder was the best tool for that job. It was able to capture some of the dynamic JavaScript that wasn’t being

DH 2018

From the Presidential election to the World Cup watch parties, it was an electrifying time to be in downtown Mexico City for DH2018. SUP’s digital publishing initiative was well-represented at the week-long conference, sending our Acquisitions Editor, Digital Production Associate, and Sales and Exhibits Manager. Our group demoed several of our digital publications, including the

¡Hola, Digital Humanities!

The supDigital team is at DH2018 in Mexico City this week, catching up with friends and colleagues and meeting lots of new ones. If you’re here come say hi! We’re at the table at the top of the stairs above registration. You’re welcome to stop by and check out our latest interactive publications making waves

Announcing Release of New Digital Project

We are pleased to announce the publication of our newest digital project: When Melodies Gather by Samuel Liebhaber. With over sixty audio and video recordings of poems in the Southern Arabian language of Mahri, this project lets you dive in and experience the practice of crafting poetry in an unwritten language. The more theoretically minded should head over

JCDL 2018

I’ve spent this week in Fort Worth, Texas at the Joint Conference of Digital Libraries. It’s a conference that brings together a somewhat surprisingly diverse set of people, from academics, to computer scientists, to web archivists, to, (of course) librarians. But despite its title, a show of hands at the first keynote indicated that only

A Symposium of Our Own

It will be another week before we can fully process and report out on what was a truly informative and productive last few days. Over the past several weeks we’ve been organizing and planning for the Preservation at Stanford University Press Workshop which was held May 14-15 at Stanford University. We brought together many of